Hi! Got an English text and want to see how to pronounce it? This online converter of English text to IPA phonetic transcription will translate your English text into its phonetic transcription using International Phonetic Alphabet. Paste or type your English text in the text field above and click “Show transcription” button (or use [Ctrl+Enter] shortcut from the text input area).

Features:

  • Choose between British and American* pronunciation. When British option is selected the [r] sound at the end of the word is only voiced if followed by a vowel, which follows British phonetic convention.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols used.
  • The structure of the text and sentences in it (line breaks, punctuation marks, etc.) is preserved in phonetic transcription output making it easier to read.
  • An option to vary pronunciation depending on whether words are in stressed or weak position in the sentence, as in connected speech (checkbox “Show weak forms”).
  • Words in CAPS are interpreted as acronyms if the word is not found in the database. Acronym transcriptions will be shown with hyphens between letters.
  • In addition to commonly used vocabulary the database contains a very substantial amount of place names (including names of countries, their capitals, US states, UK counties), nationalities and popular names.
  • You can output the text and its phonetic transcription along each other side-by-side or line-by-line to make back-reference to the original text easier. Just tick the appropriate checkbox in the input form.
  • Where a word has a number of different pronunciations (highlighted in blue in the output) you can select the one that agrees with the context by clicking on it. To see a popup with a list of possible pronunciations move your mouse cursor over the word.
    Note that different pronunciations of one word may have different meanings or may represent variations in pronunciation with the same meaning. If unsure which pronunciation is relevant in your particular case, consult a dictionary.
  • The dictionary database is regularly amended with most popular missing words (shown in red in the output).
  • The text can be read out loud in browsers with speech synthesis support (Safari – recommended, Chrome).
*) American transcriptions are based on the open Carnegie Mellon University Pronouncing Dictionary.

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user3456Silvia genovesiduque patropolisdzung,Kia Recent comment authors

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Silvia genovesi
Silvia genovesi

Hi, everyone! I don’t understand why the word is with instead of . can someone answer me, please? Thank you 🙂

duque patropolis
duque patropolis

I believe (tophonetics) transcribes the word “WITH” incorrectly. It should be a non-voiced TH, just air pushed between tongue and teeth. thanks

user3456
user3456

if you hover your mouse above the result of “with”, you will see that it lists both versions, people use both. You can tell when there are more ways to pronounce the word, in those cases the text is blue.

dzung,
dzung,

i have an important question. when i copy the words, they are wrong order, i would like to send you the picture, please reply me, thanks a lot ; nttdung1980@gmail.com

Spencer
Spencer

It doesn’t properly convert the “dge” sound, like in “fudge” or “badge”. It should come back with a “dʒ” but instead it says it’s something like “djɪ”

duquepatropolis
duquepatropolis

Why do “ear” and “dear” use different sounds? The first uses “i”, the second uses “I” (capital i) symbol.

duquepatropolis
duquepatropolis

Never mind. I think I just figured it out. Thanks

duquepatropolis
duquepatropolis

I’ve been comparing some words. The BED and HAIR don’t have the same same sound, yet you used the same symbol for both. Please explain why. The symbol of the “e” and upside down “e” next to each other for HAIR would make them different. Thanks

David
David

i need help
čuwzəz

Summer
Summer

sorry i am new in this, but which one is the Received Pronunciation? Is it British one?

Veralyn
Veralyn

Yes! Received Pronunciation is also known as the Queen’s English, or as BBC English.

Manuel
Manuel

If we could download the sound file like mp3 for example would be really cool. It’s useful to have the sound file to study.