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Hi! Got an English text and want to see how to pronounce it? This online converter of English text to IPA phonetic transcription will translate your English text into its phonetic transcription using International Phonetic Alphabet. Paste or type your English text in the text field above and click “Show transcription” button (or use [Ctrl+Enter] shortcut from the text input area).

Features:

  • Choose between British and American* pronunciation. When British option is selected the [r] sound at the end of the word is only voiced if followed by a vowel, which follows British phonetic convention.
  • International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols used.
  • The structure of the text and sentences in it (line breaks, punctuation marks, etc.) is preserved in phonetic transcription output making it easier to read.
  • An option to vary pronunciation depending on whether words are in stressed or weak position in the sentence, as in connected speech (checkbox “Show weak forms”).
  • Words in CAPS are interpreted as acronyms if the word is not found in the database. Acronym transcriptions will be shown with hyphens between letters.
  • In addition to commonly used vocabulary the database contains a very substantial amount of place names (including names of countries, their capitals, US states, UK counties), nationalities and popular names.
  • You can output the text and its phonetic transcription along each other side-by-side or line-by-line to make back-reference to the original text easier. Just tick the appropriate checkbox in the input form.
  • Where a word has a number of different pronunciations (highlighted in blue in the output) you can select the one that agrees with the context by clicking on it. To see a popup with a list of possible pronunciations move your mouse cursor over the word.
    Note that different pronunciations of one word may have different meanings or may represent variations in pronunciation with the same meaning. If unsure which pronunciation is relevant in your particular case, consult a dictionary.
  • The dictionary database is regularly amended with most popular missing words (shown in red in the output).
  • The text can be read out loud in browsers with speech synthesis support (Safari – recommended, Chrome).
*) American transcriptions are based on the open Carnegie Mellon University Pronouncing Dictionary.
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NappoTapo
NappoTapo

An alternative pronunciation of Ian should be /iɪn/

Alex
Alex

Great! Thank you! Just one thing I noticed, the approximant [ɹ] is being transcribed with the post alveolar trill [r]

Mark Answine
Mark Answine

I would suggest that [dəˈgrɛs] is an alternate pronunciation of “digress,” following the notion that the unstressed syllable is reduced to schwa.

Jose S ;)

Seria Bueno que tuviera divicion de silabas.

Mark Answine
Mark Answine

Agree. I have often thought the same thing. Perhaps there could be a check box to make displaying the syllable breaks an option.

Taciana Kelly Gonzaga
Taciana Kelly Gonzaga
Ilya
Ilya

Отстуствует транскрипция для: synchronicity debounce

Florian Rehme
Florian Rehme

Hey! First of all, I wanna say thank you for this converter. I´ve discovered it about 2 years ago and have been using it very frequently ever since. Just one question concerning the American IPA transcription. Have you considered implementing medial-t-voicing/ flapping (the tendency of American speakers to voice /t/ if it occurs between two vowels and if the second syllable is unstressed)? When I looked up the American IPA transcriptions for words like atom, Italy, or rhetoric on here I noticed that they`re transcribed with the regular /t/ sound. But yeah, it was just a thought since I believe it is quite a remarkable feature of American English pronunciation. Nevertheless, great work on this website! Greetings from Germany 🙂

Wellington
Wellington

I agree! I’ve also been looking for the t sound.

Florian
Florian

I noticed that I didn’t really give an example of what the phoneme i was talking about actually looks like. Just an example: If the flap sound was implemented ‚atom‘ would be transcribed /æt̬əm/ instead of /ætəm/ (only for AmE though).

мирослав
мирослав

это что ˈfɪzɪkəl ˌɛdju(ː)ˈkeɪʃən?
что за скобки?

Vassilis
Vassilis

Thank you so much! I’ve got a phonetics exam coming up, your page helped me so much!
much appreciate it!
would love to donate a lot but I’m a broke student :S
keep up the good work, cheers!

Юлия
Юлия

Вот такой вопрос. Слово /fists/ – транскрипция /fɪsts/.
Нашла в пособии одном “Позиция звука /t/ между двумя /s/ лишает его апикальности; в таких условиях артикулируется предорсальный аллофон фонемы /t/ со щелевым размыканием – /tz/.”
Почему в транскрипции это не отражается?
Должно быть так: /fɪstzs|? Или так |fɪstz/?
Не могу понять.