¡Hola! ¿Tienes un texto en inglés y quieres saber cómo pronunciarlo? Este transcriptor en línea de texto en inglés a transcripción fonética AFI convertirá tu texto en inglés en su transcripción fonética usando el Alfabético Fonético Internacional. Pega o tipea tu texto en inglés en el campo de texto de arriba y haz clic en el botón “Mostrar transcripción” (o usa el atajo [Ctrl+Enter] desde el área de ingreso de texto).

Características:

  • Elija entre la pronunciación británica y americana*. Cuando se selecciona el dialecto británico, el sonido [r] al final de una palabra sólo se pronuncia si es seguido por una vocal, lo que también sigue la convención fonética británica.
  • Se usan los símbolos del Alfabeto Fonético Internacional (AFI).
  • La estructura del texto y de las oraciones dentro de él (cortes de línea, signos de puntuación, etc.) se conservan en la transcripción fonética, haciendo que sea más fácil de leer.
  • Una opción para variar la pronunciación dependiendo de si las palabras están en posición acentuada o débil en la oración, como en el discurso fluido (casilla “Mostrar formas débiles”).
  • Las palabras en MAYÚSCULAS se interpretan como siglas si la palabra no se encuentra en la base de datos. Las transcripciones de siglas se muestran con guiones entre las letras.
  • Además del vocabulario de uso común, la base de datos contiene una cantidad sustancial de nombres de lugares (incluyendo nombres de países, sus capitales, estados de EE.UU, condados del Reino Unido), nacionalidades y nombres populares.
  • Para facilitar la referencia al texto original, puedes hacer que el texto y su transcripción fonética salgan lado a lado en dos columnas. Sólo selecciona la casilla apropiada en el formulario de entrada.
  • Si una palabra tiene varias pronunciaciones diferentes (estas palabras están señaladas en azul), puedes seleccionar la más apropiada al contexto haciendo clic sobre ella. Para ver una ventana emergente con una lista de las posibles pronunciaciones, mueve el cursor de tu mouse por encima de la palabra.
    Ten en cuenta que las diferentes pronunciaciones de una palabra pueden tener significados diferentes o pueden representar variaciones de pronunciación con el mismo significado. Si no estás seguro de qué pronunciación es relevante en tu caso particular, consulta un diccionario.
  • La base de datos del diccionario es enmendada regularmente con las palabras faltantes más populares (mostradas en rojo).
  • El texto puede ser leído en voz alta en los navegadores con soporte de síntesis de voz (Safari – recomendado, Chrome).
*) American transcriptions are based on the open Carnegie Mellon University Pronouncing Dictionary.

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Paul
Paul

Hi! I can clearly see the phonetic transcription, and I can hit play to hear where the stress lies, but just curious – why aren’t stress and minor stress marks part of the transcription here, as they would be in a dictionary?

mohamed
mohamed

j’aime bien ce site,il est vraiment bien pour les etudiants je le conseille

Jan
Jan

Firstly, thanks for the tool! It has proven itself to be very useful since times before the site’s name change.

Just a heads-up:
The British transcription for ‘super’ given above is /ˈs(j)uːpə/
Optional (limited) or no, there is no /j/ in that word in the standardised form. According to the above tool, this becomes a clearly enunciated /j/ in words which contain ‘super’ e.g. ‘supercilious’, ‘superficial’, ‘superfluous’, and ‘supersonic’ while maintaining the parentheses on the /j/ for prefixed words like ‘superbug’ and ‘superconductor’. Consider removing the /j/ as it is inaccurate and unnecessary. As a reference, check the following:
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/super_1
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/super
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/super_1

Nik Edmiidz

I feel American nurse should be nɚs, not nɜrs.

Юлия

А можете сделать, чтобы ещё русские слова, предложения на английский переводило?

Tory Glenn
Tory Glenn

For your transcription of ‘year’ to / jɪr / I’m not sure I agree with the use of that / r / . Based on the IPA, that /r/ represents a ‘trill’ rather tha an ‘approximant’ / ɹ /

Jaddy
Jaddy

Just typed in “comb” and got “kəʊm” for British English. I was almost sure that was wrong so I went to US English and received “koʊm” which is more like what I was expecting. Kəʊm might be acceptable for a few vernacular forms of British English but would be very strange to the majority of speakers here. I’m still learning IPA and I just wanted to flag this because otherwise this has been really useful.

Linda Reed
Linda Reed

The əʊ in /kəʊm/ is the way that Received Pronunciation has standardized the vowel sound. It sounds pretty pretentious to a lot of people though, since it isn’t how most native speakers really say it in Britain. RP is based on one particular dialect frozen in time, which is why it probably sounds a bit weird to you. Go with what your ear tells you when transcribing. Just be aware that RP will always prescribe that diphthong.

Martin
Martin

Hello, thanks a lot for this tool!
I’m guessing it might be a bit complicated to implement, because of homophonic words, but is there any plan to allow reverse transcription ie. from phonetic to english? If not does anyone know a site that does that? I’m trying to teach a Deep Learning AI to learn poetry, it understands english syntax, and approximates lines length well enough however it doesn’t seem to catch on rhymes, which is why I’m looking into this.
Thanks again

Emma
Emma

It would be very useful to have a translator from phonetics to English text. I’m studying my Phonetics course for example and don’t recognize the word in Phonetic transcription.

Linda Reed
Linda Reed

You will eventually gain that skill. You’ll have to work on understanding the sound relationships on the IPA charts and producing the sounds yourself. That’s part of the challenge of all phonetics classes. In theory, you should learn to be able to see any line of phonetic transcription (from any language) and at least imagine what it would sound like, even if producing it is a challenge for you. As long as it was transcribed correctly from English, you’ll know what the English word is.

dan
dan

you’re studying phonetics and you can’t read phonetic transcriptions?? maybe you’re just a bad student?

Irene
Irene

Thank you for sharing this page! It has been very useful for me and I have taught my students the wonders of phonetics. Moreover, I would like to now if it is possible for you to add a section in which us as ESL teachers can have the possibility to review and refresh the chacarectiristics of each phoneme (e.g. labial, fricatives, voiced, voiceless, and so on). It would be fantastic since I do not have any material about it. I would appreciate it so much!